Lengitines and freckles

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Helios

The Ephelides or freckles are small macules (spots), usually 1 to 2 mm in diameter, light brown in sun-exposed areas. The lengitines are lesions usually multiple, often on exposed areas like the face and back of hands.

Actinic lentigines
Also called solar lentigines, consist of brown spots with varying tones. The size varies from a few millimeters to several centimeters and its edges are irregular.
They usually appear after ages 40 to 50 and are often more intense and numerous in whiter skinned people. Must be distinguished from malignant lentigines which generally have irregular borders and uneven coloration, is frequently observed hypo chromic regression areas (clear).
Such as ephelides, actinic lentigines do not undergo malignant transformation. Treatment of both freckles as solar lentigines is in high demand for cosmetic reasons.
Cryosurgery or electrocoagulation as well as 5-fluorouracil, retinoic acid and the others are used frequently. However in modern therapy Q-switched Frequency Doubled Nd:YAG laser and 1064 nm ir usually performed these days. One of the most modern methods uses the HELIOS II system in 532 nm Q-switched Mode which easily eliminates this type of lesion in a single session, without causing skin damage or adverse effects. These lesions are considered a direct consequence of exposure to sunlight, therefore, suitable sun protection creams contributes to prevention.
Ephelides (Freckles)
Ephelides (Freckles) They are common in blond individuals seem to be passed through inheritance. The freckles darken and increase in size and number when exposed to sun and are more evident in summer and lighter in winter.
Histopathological studies show an increase of epidermal melanin. They are benign and do not tend to develop other injuries. Generally tend to be reduced over the years.
The ephelides can be distinguished from permanent freckles observed

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